SATURDAY SNAPSHOTS: PIG THOUGHTS

” ‘When you wake up in the morning, Pooh,’ said Piglet at last, ‘what’s the first thing you say to yourself?’

‘What’s for breakfast?’ said Pooh.

‘What do you say, Piglet?’

‘I say, I wonder what’s going to happen exciting to-day?’ said Piglet.

Pooh nodded thoughtfully. ‘It’s the same thing,’ he said.’ ” – A.A. Milne

 

FROSTY PIGS MAR 2018 BARLEY DARTS

 

 

FRIDAY FRONTIER: ENDURANCE

 

FULLER HOMESTEAD MAR 2018 BARLEY DARTS

This vacant homestead is a couple of miles up the road from our own.  The humble little shack on the far left, was likely the house.  To the far right, is the modest barn that may have sheltered a working horse and a milk cow.  The two small sheds in between, may have housed chickens and a workshop.

Year after year, these remnants continue to endure our bitter, winter storms with strong, north winds.  And year after year, I marvel at the skills of the folks that built it; all by hand.  I marvel at their lives of endurance, their sacrifices, their blood, their sweat, and their tears.  I marvel that America’s very foundation was built this way; one rock, one stick, one day, and one life at a time.  And I marvel that it was built with the help of family, friends, neighbors, churches, and communities; from one generation to the next.

Meanwhile, I marvel at modern Americans.  They have ample free time.  Yet, instead of helping one another, they live to rip each other apart.  And the only thing they work hard to do, is to tear our communities and country down.  Few, if any, understand what it actually took to build it all up.  In fact, few have the skills to build anything at all, besides chaos.  And even fewer sow anything, besides discord.  Alas, even the remaining remnants of yesteryear, may not weather and endure even one more generation…

 

THURSDAY THANKS: LEEKS

DEHYDRATED LEEKS BARLEY DARTS

Thanks to one of Keith’s cousins, we love leeks.  They are amazing fresh from the garden, simmered in soups, or caramelized.  They are also a staple for our winter pantry.  Dehydrated, they retain both their green color and a mild flavor.  Just add them to baked potatoes, omelettes, and chicken soup for an instant taste of summer.

TUESDAY TAIL TALE: MOM!

MOM! MOM! He’s on my side!  MOM! He won’t leave me alone! MOM! He’s looking at me funny.  MOM, MOM, MOM!!! (Yeah, you think it’s funny, but you’re not MOM!)

MONDAY MEMOIR: TONS

ANTIQUE SCALE 5 PLUS POUNDS BARLEY DARTS

 

How much food do you eat every year?  Don’t know?  Well, thanks to the Google god, you can find out with the press of a button.  Unfortunately, you can’t eat Google and you should know this stuff.  BEWARE!  It may shock and offend you.  And you’ll most likely deny it, too.  Statistically, you eat five and a half pounds of food; every day.  Seriously.  That’s just you.  It doesn’t include your family members.  Add that up for twelve months and you’ll get 1996 pounds.  That’s nearly one ton of food every year.[1]    Yet, this post  is not about dieting or eating too much food.

 

Perhaps, you’ve talked about donating a ton of food to a third-world country.  Maybe, you’ve said you’re getting a ton of food at Walmart, as you’ve filled your cart with cheap pizzas.  Maybe, you’ve raved about the ton of food, at the local all-you-can-eat buffet.  Sadly, you may have made fun of America’s obese, by saying they eat a ton of food every day.  Less likely, you’ve ordered a ton of feed at the elevator for livestock.  But, have you ever talked about an actual ton of food for yourself?  Do you know what an actual ton of food looks like?

Yes, one ton of food can be hard to imagine and growing it is definitely a challenge.  Then again, starving to death is hard to imagine and morbid obesity and urban, food deserts are challenging, too.  Alas, there’s no arguing that to live, we need food.  However, who grows it, the type, the quantity, and the quality have and will continue to be sources of heated debate.  Meanwhile, we work hard to stay in touch with our own food; every day.  And believe it or not, it ranges from about five and a half pounds to a ton, per day!

 

 

[1] (Aubrey, 2011)